This paper, a first in the series of women's political leagues, is a literature review paper, providing an overview of the information on women's political leagues and wings that exist already. It explores the organization, structure and role women's leagues play in increasing the political participation of women. It also examines the challenges women's leagues face, hindering the progress of both their agenda and those of the women in the political environment.

RAU conducted an online survey to establish young women's views on politics as we prepare for elections next year (2018) as a follow up to research conducted with groups of middle class women in 2016.  This research is important as it contributes to the efforts by other organisations and movements to encourage women to participate more in national governance.

This preliminary report examines some of the changes that have taken place in Zimbabwean women’s agency since 2004. It follows on from several analyses of the Afrobarometer data in recent years, all as part of the Research and Advocacy Unit (RAU) programme on active citizenship, which, with the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), has looked at youth and violence, and women’s agency.

Beyond 2023

This opinion piece makes a case for quotas, arguing their need as a correction for past practices and a system that has long proven its importance in achieving gender parity. Despite the challenges quotas present, there is need to extend the lifespan of the quotas in the National Assembly beyond 2023 to fully see the results.

In 2013, Zimbabwe enacted a new Constitution, including strong gender equality provisions that outlaw discrimination against women. The new Constitution promotes women’s full participation in all aspects of society and abolishes all “laws, customs, traditions, and practices” that infringe upon women’s rights and equality with men. But the Constitution’s mandate for gender equality is not necessarily reflected in Zimbabwe’s existing laws or practices.

Women are under-represented in most if not all of Zimbabwe’s political institutions, irrespective of the fact that the Constitution, in sections 17 and 56 states that there should be equal representation. This current opinion piece discusses the problems and offers a range of solutions.

Most if not all of the so called female political activists in Zimbabwe are in fact not political

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